Fiction, Fiction Reviews, Netgalley/ARCs, Reviews, Series Reviews, Updates, Young Adult books, Young Adult Reveiws

Update: What I Read in March…

update2015

March was a slow month for me. I read most of my To-Read list, but not all of it. April will be a better month. In March I read:

Mini Review: “The Last Flight of Poxl West” by Daniel Torday

Review: “Legend” by Marie Lu

Review: “All the Light We Cannot See” by Anthony Doerr

Review: “Afterworlds” by Scott Westerfeld

Review: “Making History” by Stephen Fry

ICYMI: All the above titles are links to reviews.

Review: Denton Little’s Deathdate (Review coming in April)

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Fiction, Fiction Reviews, Netgalley/ARCs, Reviews

Mini Review: “The Last Flight of Poxl West” by Daniel Torday


*This ARC was provided for free by the publisher through Netgalley in return for an honest review.

Pub. Date: 3/17/2105

Publisher: St. Martin’s Press

4 of 5 stars ★★★★☆

This book is incredible. The writing style is unique, but the stories seem to rise from the page. I skimmed this book, so I’m holding off giving it a full review. I’ve just worn myself out on WWII lit for a while. From what I’ve read, it will be a really good read from start to finish. Here’s the summary via Goodreads:

All his life, Elijah Goldstein has idolized his charismatic Uncle Poxl. Intensely magnetic, cultured and brilliant, Poxl takes Elijah under his wing, introducing him to opera and art and literature. But when Poxl publishes a memoir of how he was forced to leave his home north of Prague at the start of WWII and then avenged the deaths of his parents by flying RAF bombers over Germany during the war, killing thousands of German citizens, Elijah watches as the carefully constructed world his uncle has created begins to unravel. As Elijah discovers the darker truth of Poxl’s past, he comes to understand that the fearless war hero he always revered is in fact a broken and devastated man who suffered unimaginable losses from which he has never recovered.

The Last Flight of Poxl West beautifully weaves together what it means to be a family in the shadow of war— to love, to lose, and to heal.

If you’re a fan of All the Light We Cannot See, Life After Life, and other WWII era reads, then go and check this one out!
Full review to come.

Fiction, Netgalley/ARCs, Upcoming reads, Young Adult books

What I’ll be Reading in March…

So March is going to be a busy month reading wise. I’ve made quite a list for myself. Here’s what I’ve got in store:

One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Ken Kesey: I’ll be listening to this as an audiobook. It’s a modern classic, so hopefully it’ll better than On the Road.

The Turnip Princess and Other Newly Discovered Fairy Tales, Franz Xaver Von Schonwerth: This is a Netgalley ARC. It’s a Penguin Classic, so it should be good.

 Denton Little’s Deathdate, Lance Rubin: This is also an ARC, but from what I’ve read, it seems to be good.

 The Last Flight of Poxl West, Daniel Torday: Again, an ARC about WWII, London, and other stuff I read too much.

All the Light We Cannot See, Anthony Doerr: I’m listening to this one and it’s an interesting story, but it loops around so much that I don’t always know what’s going on. It’s about WWII, Europe, and radios.

Making History, Stephen Fry: It’s Stephen Fry. There’s time travel. It’s about WWII. England appears a lot in here…so basically you see why I’m reading it.

I’ve got other books on the back burner, so I’d better get to it.

Fiction, Fiction Reviews, Netgalley/ARCs, Reviews, Upcoming reads, Young Adult books

Upcoming Reads: March Netgalley ARCS

I’m still working my way through my Netgalley ARCs. I’ve got seven books left to review, and the ones below are set to archive soon. So, for March, I’ll be reading:
Denton Little’s Deathdate, Lance Rubin

Pub. Date: April 14th 2015

Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers 

Denton Little’s Deathdate takes place in a world exactly like our own except that everyone knows the day they will die. For 17-year-old Denton Little, that’s tomorrow, the day of his senior prom.

Despite his early deathdate, Denton has always wanted to live a normal life, but his final days are filled with dramatic firsts. First hangover. First sex. First love triangle (as the first sex seems to have happened not with his adoring girlfriend, but with his best friend’s hostile sister. Though he’s not totally sure. See: first hangover.) His anxiety builds when he discovers a strange purple rash making its way up his body. Is this what will kill him? And then a strange man shows up at his funeral, claiming to have known Denton’s long-deceased mother, and warning him to beware of suspicious government characters…. Suddenly Denton’s life is filled with mysterious questions and precious little time to find the answers.

Debut author Lance Rubin takes us on a fast, furious, and outrageously funny ride through the last hours of a teenager’s life as he searches for love, meaning, answers, and (just maybe) a way to live on.”(Goodreads)

*I’ve read about 65% of this one and I am really enjoying it.

The Last Flight of Poxl West, Daniel Torday

Pub. Date: March 17th 2015

Publisher: St. Martin’s Press

“All his life, Elijah Goldstein has idolized his charismatic Uncle Poxl. Intensely magnetic, cultured and brilliant, Poxl takes Elijah under his wing, introducing him to opera and art and literature. But when Poxl publishes a memoir of how he was forced to leave his home north of Prague at the start of WWII and then avenged the deaths of his parents by flying RAF bombers over Germany during the war, killing thousands of German citizens, Elijah watches as the carefully constructed world his uncle has created begins to unravel. As Elijah discovers the darker truth of Poxl’s past, he comes to understand that the fearless war hero he always revered is in fact a broken and devastated man who suffered unimaginable losses from which he has never recovered.

The Last Flight of Poxl West beautifully weaves together what it means to be a family in the shadow of war— to love, to lose, and to heal.”(Goodreads)

 

 

The Turnip Princess and Other Newly Discovered Fairy Tales, Franz Xaver Von Schonwerth

Pub. Date:February 24th 2015

Publisher: Penguin Classics

“A rare discovery in the world of fairy tales – now for the first time in English. With this volume, the holy trinity of fairy tales – the Brothers Grimm, Charles Perrault, and Hans Christian Andersen – becomes a quartet. In the 1850s, Franz Xaver von Schönwerth traversed the forests, lowlands, and mountains of northern Bavaria to record fairy tales, gaining the admiration of even the Brothers Grimm. Most of Schönwerth’s work was lost – until a few years ago, when thirty boxes of manu­scripts were uncovered in a German municipal archive. Now, for the first time, Schönwerth’s lost fairy tales are available in English. Violent, dark, and full of action, and upending the relationship between damsels in distress and their dragon-slaying heroes, these more than seventy stories bring us closer than ever to the unadorned oral tradition in which fairy tales are rooted, revolutionizing our understanding of a hallowed genre. ‘Schönwerth’s tales have a compositional fierceness and energy rarely seen in stories gathered by the Brothers Grimm or Charles Perrault’ -The New Yorker ‘Schönwerth’s legacy counts as the most significant collection in the German-speaking world in the nineteenth century’ – Daniel Drascek, University of Regensburg Franz Xanver von Schönwerth (1810-1886) was born in Bavaria and had a successful career in law and the Bavarian royal court before devoting himself to researching the customs of his homeland and preserving its fairy tales and folklore. Maria Tatar chairs the program in folklore and mythology at Harvard, and has edited and translated many collections of fairy tales. Eeika Eichenseer is a historian and preservationist working for the Bavarian government and the director of the Franz Xaver von Schönwerth Society”(Goodreads)

Reviews to come!