Book Lists, Fiction, Non-Fiction Reviews, Reviews, Upcoming reads

New Releases: May 2018

So, May has some promising releases, include one where I hopefully get to meet the author.

I’m excited to have another fantasy smut novel to read. I like this series a lot more than the Throne of Glass.
Release Date: May 1
 Royals 2. Royals by Rachel Hawkins
I met Rachel back in 2011 or so at a Writer’s Conference. She’s from my hometown and lives in my college town. I’ve been a fan of hers from the beginning, and she is doing a book signing at my local Barnes and Noble. I hope I am able to go!
Release Date: May 1
Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture 3. Not That Bad edited by Roxane Gay
 It’s Roxane Gay. We all have writers that we will read anything by, without even looking at the topic, and she is one of mine. This book is about rape culture, something she has spoken widely on in the past. It will be interesting to read her edited collection on the topic.
Release Date: May 1
Calypso
4. Calypso by David Sedaris
I generally listen to David Sedaris’s audio book versions of his works because it adds to the hilarity of the work. The summary promises a different type of book than usual, so I’m excited to see how this one compares to the others, especially Me Talk Pretty One Day.
Release: May 29
What books are you looking forward to this month?
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Fiction, Upcoming reads, Young Adult books

List of Recent Releases I am Stoked About

Queue the screaming, some of the most anticipated books of 2018 have just been released and I for one am super excited.
CirceCirce by Madeline Miller
There needs to be no explanation if you’ve already read Miller’s Achilles.The Greek witch myth is something I am 100% behind, and it is by a woman who has extensive education on the topic of the Ancients. So yes. Give me. Release Date: April 10
I Met a Traveller in an Antique LandI Met a Traveller in an Antique Land by Connie Willis

Connie Willis is funny, insightful, and writes great SciFi romances. I’ll read anything she writes so this is one top of my list. Her time travel series are my favorite, but her stand alones are great as well. Release Date: April 30

 

My Oxford Year

My Oxford Year by Julia Whelan

This is a debut novel that I am looking forward to reading. It’s a novel about a young woman with ambition who is quickly introduced to the idea of love. It seems like she has to pick between the too and I will be interested to see how this plays out. Release Date: April 24

 

Dread Nation (Dread Nation, #1)

Dread Nation by Justina Ireland

This book just sounds so freaking awesome. Alternative Civil War with Zombies that kids are trained to fight? Lord have mercy. Also, that cover art is beautiful and this book has gotten a lot of hype. Release Date: April 3

 

Book Lists, Fiction, To-Read List, Upcoming reads, Young Adult books

New Releases: Mid Summer 2017

 

Summer is here and so are some of my eagerly awaited books! Below are a few of the books I have been watching (and waiting) for a while.

The CowsRelease Date: April 6, 2017

Dawn O’Porter is one of my favorite YA authors. Her characters and stories are real and not pithy like some other contemporary novels. O’Porter’s novels generally follow female protagonists and their friendship with other girls. A true coming of age story as seen from a young girl, some what of a rarity in any genre. The Goodreads summary:

COW n. /ka?/
A piece of meat; born to breed; past its sell-by-date; one of the herd.

Women don’t have to fall into a stereotype.

The Cows is a powerful novel about three women. In all the noise of modern life, each needs to find their own voice.

It’s about friendship and being female.
It’s bold and brilliant.
It’s searingly perceptive.
It’s about never following the herd.
And everyone is going to be talking about it.

Buy from Amazon ($15.02), here.

You Don't Have to Say You Love Me: A Memoir

Release Date: June 13, 2017

The author of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian packs punch with this memoir about his relationship with his mother. The Goodreads summary:

When his mother passed away at the age of 78, Sherman Alexie responded the only way he knew how: he wrote. The result is this stunning memoir. Featuring 78 poems, 78 essays and intimate family photographs, Alexie shares raw, angry, funny, profane, tender memories of a childhood few can imagine–growing up dirt-poor on an Indian reservation, one of four children raised by alcoholic parents. Throughout, a portrait emerges of his mother as a beautiful, mercurial, abusive, intelligent, complicated woman. You Don’t Have To Say You Love Me is a powerful account of a complicated relationship, an unflinching and unforgettable remembrance.

Buy from Amazon( 17.98), here.

Hunger: A Memoir of (My) BodyRelease Date: June 13, 2017

Roxane Gay is quickly becoming one of our most crucial voices. Her witty, raw writings in Bad Feminist is what first introduced me to Gay, and I have been a fan ever since. As someone who has never been the ‘normal’ body size (re I’ve always been a healthy weight or a little more), I look forward to reading this one.

Goodreads summary:

In her phenomenally popular essays and long-running Tumblr blog, Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and body, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as “wildly undisciplined,” Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care. In Hunger, she explores her own past—including the devastating act of violence that acted as a turning point in her young life—and brings readers along on her journey to understand and ultimately save herself.

With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and power that have made her one of the most admired writers of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to learn to take care of yourself: how to feed your hungers for delicious and satisfying food, a smaller and safer body, and a body that can love and be loved—in a time when the bigger you are, the smaller your world becomes.

Buy from Amazon($15.46) , here.

What books are you looking forward to this summer? Let me know in the comments below! Or better yet, have you read any of the above? What did you think?

To-Read List, Upcoming reads

Books on My To-Read List: Victorian London and Victorian Life

So I may have mentioned this, but I LOVE Victorian England. In fact, if I ever go to grad school, it would be to study Modern Literature and History 1850-Present(or something similar). I’ve been shifting through my to-read list, and I found these gems and thought I would share them. 

 The Victorians by A.N. Wilson: A.N. Wilson singles out those writers, statesmen, scientists, philosophers and soldiers whose lives illuminated an age on the cusp of modernity. He illuminates, through these signature lives, how Victorian England started a revolution that still hasn’t ended.

Victorian London: The Life of a City 1840-1870 by Liza Picard: Like her previous books, this book is the product of the author’s passionate interest in the realities of everyday life – and the conditions in which most people lived – so often left out of history books.

This period of mid-Victorian London covers a huge span: Victoria’s wedding and the place of the royals in popular esteem; how the very poor lived, the underworld, prostitution, crime, prisons and transportation; the public utilities – Bazalgette on sewers and road design, Chadwick on pollution and sanitation; private charities – Peabody, Burdett Coutts – and workhouses; new terraced housing and transport, trains, omnibuses and the Underground; furniture and decor; families and the position of women; the prosperous middle classes and their new shops, e.g. Peter Jones, Harrods; entertaining and servants, food and drink; unlimited liability and bankruptcy; the rich, the marriage market, taxes and anti-semitism; the Empire, recruitment and press-gangs.

The period begins with the closing of the Fleet and Marshalsea prisons and ends with the first (steam-operated) Underground trains and the first Gilbert & Sullivan

Bluestockings by Jane Robinson: Robinson presents the eye-opening and inspiring story of the first young women who overcame all the odds to get their education and attend university. Using the words of the women themselves, ‘Bluestockings’ charts the fight for and expansion of higher education for women from 1869 through to the 1930s.

A London Child of the 1870s by Molly Hughes: Molly Hughes vividly evokes the small, everyday pleasures of a close family life in Victorian London: joyful Christmases, blissful holidays in Cornwall, escapades with her brothers, schooldays under the redoubtful Miss Buss. The urban counterpart to Flora Thompson’s Lark Rise to Candleford, there is the same easy intimacy with the reader, the same intensity of recollection. Her college life at Cambridge and her first teaching jobs provide a fascinating glimpse into another world, full of everyday period detail, vividly and humorously told.

I haven’t read any of these yet, and I think some of them may be fairly hard to find, but I’m really looking forward to reading them some time soon. If anyone’s read any of the above books, any opinions would be most welcome!